Safety Training, Equipment, Supplies & Rentals

OSHA’s Water. Rest. Shade. campaign

Water, rest and shade are the 3 major tips that employers can establish to help prevent heat illness for outdoor workers. Heat illness is caused when body temperature rises to dangerous levels because of the hot weather, high humidity, and sweat. If appropriate precautions are not taken; symptoms can range from heat rash and heat cramps to heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Why is it important to prevent heat illness?

Heat illnesses and deaths are preventable and OSHA urges employers to establish the heat illness prevention program. While heat strokes don’t kill immediately, it can shut down major parts of the body. Workers who are suffering from heat exhaustion are at a greater risk for accidents because they are less alert and sometimes can become confused.

Workers new to the heat or those that have been away from work and are returning can be most vulnerable to heat stress and they must be acclimatized. With this being said; employers should gradually increase workloads while allowing more frequent breaks until the tolerance of working in the heat is built up.

Six steps to help prevent

  1. Stay hydrated by drinking water every 15 minutes, even if your not thirsty.
  2. Cool down by taking frequent breaks in shady areas.
  3. Wear a hat and light-colored clothing
  4. Learn the signs of heat illness and what to do in an emergency
  5. Keep an eye on your fellow workers
  6. “Easy does it” on your first days of work in the heat until you get used to it

If you are unsure what temperature ranges are at risks use the heat index table below to let you know when you need to take protective measures on heat-related illnesses.

heatindex

Training

OSHA provides you with heat training information for your workers. Please take advantage of this training. Providing your workers with these short training sessions can be the first step to help prevent heat related accidents this summer. You can check out the OSHA heat training guide

 

Four Different Categories of Fall Protection

All active fall protection in the construction industry can fall under four functional categories. OSHA helps us understand these categories by providing standards for each category of fall protection.

Fall Protection

Fall Arrest

A fall arrest system is required when any risk exists that a worker may fall from an elevated position. This system should be used anytime a working height of six feet or more is reached. Working height is the distance from the walking/working surface to a grade or lower level. This system is will only come into service when a fall occurs.

There are two major types of fall arrest: general fall arrest, such as nets; and personal fall arrest, such as lifelines. Lifeline systems must include four elements referred to as the ABCD’s of fall arrest:

A-   Anchorage-A fixed structure or structural adaptation, often including an anchorage connector, to which the other components of the personal fall arrest are rigged.

B-   Body Wear-A full body harness worn by the worker.

C-  Connector-A subsystem component connecting the harness to the anchorage.

D-  Deceleration Device-A subsystem component designed to dissipate the forces associated with a fall arrest event.

fall protection

Positioning

Positioning systems allow the worker to “sit back” in their harness while performing work with both hands. This type of protection is not designed to be used to arrest a fall, and must be used in conjunction with a fall arrest system.

Suspension

Suspension allows the worker a hands-free work environment while lowering and supporting them. This type of fall protection is widely used in window washing and painting industries. This equipment is not designed to arrest a free fall, a backup fall arrest system should always be used in conjunction with suspension.

Retrieval

Otherwise known as a rescue plan, retrieval is a crucial step in the development of a fall protection plan. This system covers the post fall scenario of retrieving a worker who has fallen. OSHA does not give any instruction regarding how to accomplish this, but does say that there must be a plan in place.

Utilizing the proper fall protection education, equipment, and training will help employers maintain a safer work environment. It is important for employers to be educated on all OSHA fall protection regulations and standards.

Being Safe in The Work Zone

April 7, 2014 to April 11, 2014 is national work zone safety awareness week. I am providing you with some helpful information to make your travels safe while going through work zones. By driving safely in work zones, motorists can help make sure everyone arrives home safely. It is your job to pay attention in work zones, not only for your personal safety, but for the safety of others around you.

Work Zone Signs

Tips for Driving in Work Zones

  1. Expect the Unexpected. Change is possible overnight where normal speed limits can get reduced, lane closures, narrowed or shifted lanes. Workers, work vehicles, or equipment may enter your lane without warning. Other vehicles may slow, stop, or change lanes unexpectedly.
  2. Don’t Speed. Obey the posted speed limit signs at all times, even when there are workers not present.
  3.  Never Tailgate. Be sure to keep a safe distance behind the car ahead of you, the construction workers, and their equipment. Rear-end collisions account for 30% of crashes in work zones.
  4. Obey Road Crew Flaggers and Pay Attention to Signs. The workers know what is best for moving traffic in a work zone and the warning signs are there to help everyone move safely through the work zone.
  5. Stay Alert and Minimize Distractions. Be sure to dedicate your full attention to the road and avoid any distractions that may take your eyes off the road. Always watch others brake lights on the vehicles ahead of you and watch the traffic around you so you can be prepared to react.
  6.  Keep Up With The Traffic Flow. Never slow down to check out what road work is being done. This can easily cause traffic back-up or even a crash.
  7. Know Before You Go. Check radio stations, the TV, internet for traffic information; this will be sure to help you schedule enough time to not rush through work zones.
  8. Be Patient and Stay Calm. Work zones aren’t there to inconvenience you. Work zone crew members are working to improve the road and make your future drive better.
  9. Wear Your Seatbelt. It is your best defense in any crash.
  10.  Remember—Dads, moms, sons, daughters, brothers, and sisters work here!

If you are able to follow these work zone safety tips you will have a more pleasant driving experience in work zones and make it through safely. If these tips are disobeyed it can result in some serious fines and penalties. Below you will find a table that shows you most of the fines for each state.

State

Violations Affected

Enhanced Penalties

Workers Must Be Present

Signs Must Be Present

Alabama

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Alaska

All

Double original fine

Arizona

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Arkansas

All moving traffic violations

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

California

Various

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Colorado

All

Double original fine

Connecticut

All moving traffic violations

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Delaware

Various

At least double original fine (1st offense)

D.C.

All moving violations

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Florida

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Georgia

Speeding

$100-$2,000 and/or up to 12 months in jail

Either work zone personnel, or barriers, work vehicles or shoulder or pavement drop offs

Yes

Hawaii

Speeding

$250

Idaho

Speeding

$50

Yes

Illinois

Speeding

$375 (1st offense); $1,000 (subsequent offenses)

Yes

Indiana

Speeding

$300 (1st offense);
$500 (2nd offense); $1,000 (3rd offense within 3 years)

Yes

Iowa

All moving vehicle violations

Double original fine (up to $1,000)

Yes

Kansas

All moving vehicle violations

Double original fine

Yes

Kentucky

Speeding

Double original fine

Louisiana

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Maine

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Maryland

Speeding

Up to $1,000

Yes

Massachusetts

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Michigan

All moving vehicle violations

Double original fine and at least 3 points

Yes

Minnesota

Speeding

Double original fine (minimum $25)

Yes

Yes

Mississippi

Speeding

Up to $250 (1st offense),
double original fine (subsequent offenses)

Yes

Yes

Missouri

Speeding or passing

Additional $250 (1st offense);
additional $300 (subsequent offenses)

Yes

Yes

Endangerment of a highway worker

Up to $10,000 fine and loss of license

Yes

Yes

Montana

All

Minimum double original fine

Yes

Yes

Nebraska

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Nevada

Various

Double original fine (up to $1,000), 6 months jail time, or 120 hrs. community service

Yes

Yes

New Hampshire

Speeding

$250-$500

Yes

Yes

New Jersey

All moving vehicle violations

Double original fine

Yes

New Mexico

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

New York

Speeding

$90-$600 or up to 30 days in jail, or both

Yes

North Carolina

Speeding

Additional $250 plus court costs

Yes

North Dakota

Speeding

Minimum $80

Yes

Yes

Ohio

Speeding

Double original fine

Must be during hours of actual work

Yes

Oklahoma

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Oregon

Various

Double original fine (few exceptions)

Pennsylvania

Various

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Rhode Island

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

South Carolina

Speeding

$75-$200 or up to 30 days jail, or both

Yes

South Dakota

Speeding

Double original fine (up to $500) or 30 days jail, or both

Yes

Yes

Tennessee

Speeding

$250-$500

Yes

Yes

Texas

All moving vehicle violations

Double original fine

Yes

Yes

Utah

Speeding

Minimum double original fine

Yes

Yes

Vermont

Speeding

Double original fine

Yes

Virgin Islands

Speeding

No data

Virginia

Speeding

Up to $500

Yes

Yes

Washington

Speeding

Double original fine

West Virginia

Speeding

Up to $200 or 20 days in jail, or both

Yes

Yes

Wisconsin

Various

Double original fine

Yes

Wyoming

None

Total States  

49 + D.C., Virgin Islands

24 + D.C.

41 + D.C.

 


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